BEYOND STREET-LIT ROADS

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BEYOND STREET-LIT ROADS
February 8th – March 8th

 

Participants:
Peter Von TiesenhausenColin LyonsSarah Anne Johnson

 
Whiles in the early Winter eve

We pass amid the gathering night

Some homestead that we had to leave

Years past; and see its candles bright

Shine in the room beside the door

Where we were merry years agone

But now must never enter more,

As still the dark road drives us on.

William Morris, The House of the Wolfings, 1889
 

BEYOND STREET-LIT ROADS

According to statistics prepared by the United Nations, 2008 marked a significant

milestone in human history: For the first time ever, the urban population was

greater than the rural one. This migration has been virtually ceaseless since the

industrial revolution, attracting people from the countryside, promising fortune for

the masses, or at least to put bread on the table. Like the ancient Greeks longed for a

lost the Golden Age, or Christians marvel at the Garden of Eden, those who left their

rural existence soon dreamed of the simple life.
 

The allure of what is perceived to be a trouble-free existence, living in harmony with

the natural world, has been reshaped time and again since the advent of the seam

engine; from the 19th century arts and crafts to 1960s counter culture, Romanticism

has continually reshaped our conception of nature. Increasingly, manufacturing is

represented in a similar light. The factories with endless conveyer belts have moved

to emerging economies, where the wages are low and the workdays long to ensure

maximum profit. In major urban centers labor has become dematerialized and global,

driven by the prevailing capitalist economical system, reducing sustainable development

into a lifestyle choice for the wealthy, such as locally produced organic sourdough bread.
 

The artists featured in this exhibition grapple with topics such as nature and

industrialism and subject them to critical processes, revealing overlooked and

quotidian stories that complicate the Romantic meta-narratives that punctuate

artistic discourse and give urban populations a misleading sense of synchronicity

with the world beyond street-lit roads. Through a process of virtual self-selection,

these artists themselves determine their own context, or at least the company

they keep in this exhibition. Every framework, every milieu, is defined by its

limits. Curatron has reformulated the role of the curator, traditionally the artistic

middleman, encouraging artists to engage an algorithmic other in a process of self-

selection. The set-up is playful, even empowering in its establishment of a network

of digital links between artist, and at the same time holds within it the seeds for a

future Romanticism.
 

Aileen Burns & Johan Lundh

 

 

This will be the second exhibition of a three exhibition series Platform will be hosting with Curatron, an online system for artists to participate in the exhibition selection process. Artists can upload profiles and apply to exhibitions. All applying artists are taking part in selection process as the system calculates everyone’s preferences and then presents an exhibiting group of artists.
curatroneq.com
 
Opening January 10th @ 18:00 – 23:00
Gallery Hours: 12:00 – 16:00, Thursday – Sunday
 

Supported by:
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